1. Align Your Content with Search Intent

Search intent (also called “user intent”) is the purpose behind every search query. Understanding and satisfying search intent is Google’s ultimate priority. Pages that rank on the first page of Google have all passed Google’s litmus test on search intent.

For instance, take a look at the search results for “how to make goat curry.”

The top search results are blog posts or videos, not eCommerce pages selling goat curry. Google understands that people who are giving this specific search are looking to learn, not to buy.

On the other hand, top search results for a query like “buy goat curry” are eCommerce pages. Because in this case, Google understands that people are in buy mode. Therefore, the top results don’t include links to goat curry recipes.

For that reason, if you would like to rank your pages on page 1 of Google in 2020, you need to understand the concept of search intent and create content that aligns with user intent.

There are four common types of search intent:

1. Informational: A search falls under informational intent when the user is looking for specific information. It can be a simple search like “what’s the weather today?” that provides instant results or something complex like “best SEO strategies” that requires a more in-depth explanation.

2. Navigational: In this case, the searcher is looking for a specific website or app. Common examples of navigational searches include “Facebook login,” “SEMrush,” and “Amazon.”

3. Commercial: The intent behind a search is commercial when the user is looking for a specific product but hasn’t made the final decision yet. For example, searches such as “best SEO tools” and “best DSLR cameras” are all commercial searches.

4. Transactional: Here, the intent is to buy. The searcher has already made a decision to buy a specific product or tool. Examples include searches such as “buy Nikon d500,” “buy Macbook Air,” and “buy groceries online.”

An SEO best practice is to always keep the search intent in mind while creating content for your website.

For instance, if you would like to rank for the keywords “best DSLR cameras,” you need to realize that the search intent here is commercial, not transactional. The user is still undecided on which DSLR brand to choose.

There is no point in optimizing your DSLR landing page with those specific keywords. Google understands what users want when the search query is “best DSLR cameras.” They are looking for options. They are looking for a blog post or video which lists down the best DSLR cameras, not product pages or eCommerce pages.

Bottom line: Create content that aligns with the search intent of your target audience.

1. Align Your Content with Search Intent

Search intent (also called “user intent”) is the purpose behind every search query. Understanding and satisfying search intent is Google’s ultimate priority. Pages that rank on the first page of Google have all passed Google’s litmus test on search intent.

For instance, take a look at the search results for “how to make goat curry.”

The top search results are blog posts or videos, not eCommerce pages selling goat curry. Google understands that people who are giving this specific search are looking to learn, not to buy.

On the other hand, top search results for a query like “buy goat curry” are eCommerce pages. Because in this case, Google understands that people are in buy mode. Therefore, the top results don’t include links to goat curry recipes.

For that reason, if you would like to rank your pages on page 1 of Google in 2020, you need to understand the concept of search intent and create content that aligns with user intent.

There are four common types of search intent:

1. Informational: A search falls under informational intent when the user is looking for specific information. It can be a simple search like “what’s the weather today?” that provides instant results or something complex like “best SEO strategies” that requires a more in-depth explanation.

2. Navigational: In this case, the searcher is looking for a specific website or app. Common examples of navigational searches include “Facebook login,” “SEMrush,” and “Amazon.”

3. Commercial: The intent behind a search is commercial when the user is looking for a specific product but hasn’t made the final decision yet. For example, searches such as “best SEO tools” and “best DSLR cameras” are all commercial searches.

4. Transactional: Here, the intent is to buy. The searcher has already made a decision to buy a specific product or tool. Examples include searches such as “buy Nikon d500,” “buy Macbook Air,” and “buy groceries online.”

An SEO best practice is to always keep the search intent in mind while creating content for your website.

For instance, if you would like to rank for the keywords “best DSLR cameras,” you need to realize that the search intent here is commercial, not transactional. The user is still undecided on which DSLR brand to choose.

There is no point in optimizing your DSLR landing page with those specific keywords. Google understands what users want when the search query is “best DSLR cameras.” They are looking for options. They are looking for a blog post or video which lists down the best DSLR cameras, not product pages or eCommerce pages.

Bottom line: Create content that aligns with the search intent of your target audience.